The Truth About Marijuana Legalization In Canada

Justin Trudeau Legalizing Marijuana

Why isn’t Marijuana legal yet?? The million dollar question every Canadian Citizen is waiting for the answer too. Justin Trudeau has promised Canadians since he stepped into office that recreational marijuana would be legal.

His approach has been that legalizing it will make it harder for younger Canadians, mostly teenagers, to have access to it. As of right now the Prime Minister’s biggest worry is that a teenager can buy a joint a lot easier then a bottle of beer.

My question is if Justin Trudeau legalized Marijuana wouldn’t it be a lot more controlled? What is he waiting for? Imagine a Pot Shop. Must be over a certain age, 2 pieces of ID required etc. Just like a liquor store. Right now it’s hard for a teenager to buy beer because you have these government (and private) liquor stores that follow the Law. It’s easier to buy a joint because anyone could be selling in on a street corner. No one is out there on a street corner selling Hard Liquor or cases of Beer.

So in the pot smokers eye Justin Trudeau legalizing Marijuana is awesome and he himself must be praised.

HOWEVER, this is the Government of Canada we are speaking about. Nothing is just that easy. They released what would be the laws that come with it. Cannabis users are not happy about this one. Supposedly you’re not able to carry a certain amount at a time and that is why pot smokers are furious!

They call it The Prohibition Part 2. They are calling it another Liberal Scam. They are calling it everything possible. One thing that they’re not calling it is a miracle. As he discusses it more and more its almost certain that he would like nothing more to legalize it with all these strict laws.

justin-trudeau-legalizing-marijuana

Justin Trudeau Legalizing Marijuana

In the last 2-3 months dispensaries around Canada have been getting shut down. In Montreal, Marijuana activist Marc Emery, opened and then forced to close 8 dispensaries. In Toronto recently Police were called and told to shut down dispensaries all around the city. It was a huge inconvenience said a lot of residents.

Is this something that could have been avoided totally? A lot of residents and business owners that live and work near there say yes. Why let them open it in the first place. They took offices and store fronts that other businesses could have opened there. It was a mess that just wasn’t necessary.

Remember when Justin Trudeau was running for office? He clearly stated that Marijuana Dispensaries should be allowed to stay open. Now he openly has said that he wants to criminally charge every dispensary out there. I firmly believe that everyone that voted, supported and worked there ass off to have him as our Prime Minister feels some what cheated. If only this had been said or clear in the first place that this would have been the outcome a lot of people wouldn’t have voted for him. Well i know the pot smokers wouldn’t.

What do you feel about our Prime Minister

Justin Trudeau Legalizing Marijuana?

The Truth About Marijuana Legalization In Canada from marijuananews

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31 thoughts on “The Truth About Marijuana Legalization In Canada”

  1. Trudeau is just another politician towing the party line.
    This legalization is less about protecting people as it is about assuring the government retains as much revenue as possible.

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  2. If they legalize now or later does not matter. People will always get it they alway have and always will.
    This is just political jiber jaber lets get it over with !!!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. it would be a legacy as he would be the first and probably only Prime Minister to accomplish this. IF he can accomplish this. I personally have my doubts!

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  3. We want the world and we want it… NOW!

    However, a fact of life is that changing laws takes a lot of time. Especially laws that will have a big impact on our society. In Canada, we create laws through a Parliamentary democracy in which elected representatives can vote for or against proposed new laws (called “bills”). Its not a dictatorship where the leader declares, “This shall be thy new law!”. Pretending that it is does not help the cause.

    Soon after the 2015 election, the government created a task force to study how best to make this major change to Canadian law, to end cannabis prohibition. The task force submitted its findings to the government at the end of 2016. The government used its recommendations to formulate a bill, which they tabled when Parliament resumed in April. This is not some conspiracy to delay legalization, as many activists seem to be insinuating. It is simply the process that have for making laws in Canada. Now that the bill is tabled, Parliament will debate it, and hopefully they change some of its unfortunate shortcomings in the process. Primary of which is the lack of restitution for the many Canadians prosecuted under our ridiculous, more-harm-than good prohibition laws. It is truly an injustice that the initial bill did not have this provision, but perhaps the Liberals figured that it would raise the barrier to getting the bill passed.

    There are many opposing voices in Parliament that must be appeased in order to pass this bill. Generations of Canadians were brain-washed by the Reagan-era “This is your brain on drugs” propaganda. There is a lot of fear around the subject. Alcohol never had to overcome such resistance, despite it being the far more harmful drug. And it certainly doesn’t help that those fearful people are the core voting constituents of elected politicians, since way too many younger Canadians abstain from voting.

    The way forward is to participate in our democracy: contact your elected representatives and tell them to support cannabis legalization, and voice your concerns.

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  4. We want the world and we want it… NOW!

    However, a fact of life is that changing laws takes a lot of time. Especially laws that will have a big impact on our society. In Canada, we create laws through a Parliamentary democracy in which elected representatives can vote for or against proposed new laws (called “bills”). Its not a dictatorship where the leader declares, “This shall be thy new law!”. Pretending that it is does not help the cause.

    Soon after the 2015 election, the government created a task force to study how best to make this major change to Canadian law, to end cannabis prohibition. The task force submitted its findings to the government at the end of 2016. The government used its recommendations to formulate a bill, which they tabled when Parliament resumed in April. This is not some conspiracy to delay legalization, as many activists seem to be insinuating. It is simply the process that we have for making laws in Canada. Now that the bill is tabled, Parliament will debate it, and hopefully they change some of its unfortunate shortcomings in the process. Primary of which is the lack of restitution for the many Canadians prosecuted under our ridiculous, more-harm-than good prohibition laws. It is truly an injustice that the initial bill did not have this provision, but perhaps the Liberals figured that it would raise the barrier to getting the bill passed.

    There are many opposing voices in Parliament that must be appeased in order to pass this bill. Generations of Canadians were brain-washed by the Reagan-era “This is your brain on drugs” propaganda. There is a lot of fear around the subject. Alcohol never had to overcome such resistance, despite it being the far more harmful drug. And it certainly doesn’t help that those fearful people are the core voting constituents of elected politicians, since way too many younger Canadians abstain from voting.

    The way forward is to participate in our democracy: contact your elected representatives and tell them to support cannabis legalization, and voice your concerns.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely Brent, we agree with everything you have said. Have you had a chance to read up on the new proposed bills for when Marijuana does eventually get legalized? If you have then you would have noticed that even though much is changing moving forward the newly proposed bill has just as much ridiculousness, and possibly even more-harm-than good laws contained within it. What are you thoughts on this?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I wouldn’t go so far as to say that the new law has “as much” ridiculousness as the current one. Currently, one can be charged with a criminal offence, fined $1000 and jailed for 6 months for possession of under 30g of marijuana. If the bill passed into law as-is, then under the same circumstance one won’t be charged at all because it will be totally legal. Canadians will toke with impunity. That is a huge step forward. A big win for sanity.

        Why the magic 30g limit, I have no idea and think its insane. I once picked up a cube van full of beer kegs for a party I hosted, and that was perfectly legal. The same truck full of marijuana would be less harmful, yet illegal. This absurdity is a left-over from outdated prohibition-era thinking, and I fully expect that in time it will be removed.

        They haven’t yet worked out the specific penalties for over 30g limit, merely saying “tickets for small amounts”, and up to 5 years in jail. Illegal distribution up to 14 years in jail. That is extremely excessive and makes no sense, given the previous paragraph — yet it is still an improvement over the current state of affairs. As people see that the sky doesn’t fall when people are free to consume marijuana, attitudes of the public will change, and the injustice of these regulations will be exposed. I hope.

        The increased police powers for impaired driving are due to a lack of technology. There is no cannabis breathalyzer, and it may not even be possible to measure “stonededness”. So what are lawmakers to do? The public demands that the roads be policed for sobriety. But police can already arrest a driver they think is impaired by drugs, so there is no good reason to expand their power. This is a pure political appeasement strategy, and I hope that Parliament removes that part. Wishful thinking.

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  5. They are taking away more rights then they are giving back…..we will all lose alot more then we will gain with this new legislation….. and I believe everything the libs are hoping nobody will notice cuz the pot smokers will just be happy to get legal weed and everyone else will think it just doesn’t have anything to do with them if they don’t smoke pot. Everyone needs to pay attention to whats happening here …….. nothing but lies and loss of rights and freedoms!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oddball, I am curious as to how you came to that conclusion. Could you be specific as to what rights you think we have now, that we won’t have if the bill passed as-is?

      As far as I can see, the only loss of rights proposed — kinda — is regards to roadside sobriety testing. Since there is no technology to test for marijuana, they propose increasing police powers to charge people on mere suspicion of being stoned. So don’t drive while sleepy I guess. I suspect that this provision, if it makes it into law, will fail when tested in the courts after a cop charges a sober person who has a good lawyer.

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      1. actually Brent, there is roadside sobriety testing that the OPP have been using for some months now! me myself was stopped and asked to participate. at the time they advised me anything they find will not be used against me as this was a trial period screening systems test saliva for the presence of drugs, including cannabis, cocaine, methamphetamine and opioids. Currently, the Criminal Code authorizes police officers to conduct a standard field sobriety test on a suspected impaired driver. If the officer has a reasonable belief that an offence has been committed, a specially trained officer can be called to conduct a drug recognition evaluation.

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  6. I believe that it is all stall tactics and in reality it will not become legal. They have pushed the bill a few times already and most recently have changed it again from Canada day 2018.
    The government doesn’t spend enough time sitting in the house of commons to pass a bill which is why it’s been years and will continue to be years until the liberals are voted out and the whole legalization plan is scrapped.

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    1. Not true, Stefania. There has only been one legalization bill, the “Cannabis Act”, and it was introduced on April 13, 2017. They did change their goal of passing the bill from Canada Day 2018 to *before* that day, in July 2018. It may be true that Parliament doesn’t sit often enough, but thats the schedule they’ve had for a long time before this bill was introduced. Its worth noting that the reason they want the bill passed by July 2018 is because they want it implemented into Canadian society before the next election, to avoid the scenario you describe.

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  7. I suppose the idea behind harsh penalties for *illegal* distribution is to stomp out the black market. To create strong incentives for sellers to acquire provincially issued licenses, and come into the fold of regulated industry. The federal government is leaving those regulatory frameworks to the provinces; they want it to be just like liquor. Good luck with that! 🙂

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  8. I feel that our prime minister is unable to act the way he wants to because of limitations, Canada’s political system is extremely limiting. As much as it is an inconvenience and shouldn’t happen, I think that issues like this are unavoidable.

    Liked by 7 people

  9. I think that our prime minister promised more than he could deliver, the Canadian political system is extremely limiting to the power and changes he can make. As much as this sucks and it is inconvenient, and shouldn’t happen, it’s unavoidable.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Power to the people! Shine on you crazy diamond! So much too say…so little time….this is a great time in history….we’ll all look back at 2017-2018 and think man….that was a great year✌✌
    Give peace a chance✌✌🎤🎶🎵

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    1. Power to the people! Shine on you crazy diamond! So much too say…so little time….this is a great time in history….we’ll all look back at 2017-2018 and think man….that was a great year✌✌
      Give peace a chance✌✌🎤🎶🎵

      Like

  11. Here’s a very good lawyer’s overview of the Cannabis Act of 2017: http://www.slaw.ca/2017/04/18/canadas-cannabis-act-a-high-level-overview/

    One point of confusion I keep seeing is in regards to the status of retail marijuana dispensaries. The current regulations cover *medical* licensed producers under the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (“ACMPR”). The new Cannabis Act will create the foundation for a separate regulatory framework for non-medical growing, distribution, and sales. This means that people who want to grow and sell recreational cannabis will be able to apply to *the province* in which they operate for a license, the same way that liquor stores must do. Growers will have to do the same. It will be up to the provinces to create the regulations for growing and selling. They have 15 months to create the regulations.

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