Senate Responds Back To Jeff Sessions Which Will End Marijuana Prohibition!

Congress took a step toward easing its stance on medical marijuana on Thursday.

U.S. Sens. Rand Paul (R-Kentucky), Corey Booker (D-New Jersey) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-New York) introduced a bill that would end the federal prohibition of medical marijuana and take steps to improve research.

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The Compassionate Access, Research Expansion and Respect States, or CARERS, Act would effectively change the Controlled Substances Act, allowing the possession, production and distribution of medical marijuana in states with established marijuana laws.

Jeff Sessions came out yesterday and made an announcement wanting to end the search for Medical Marijuana. Why he is so against it I am not sure. There is probably someone in the background who controls all this who wants them to not end the Medical Marijuana prohibition.

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Twenty-nine states, as well as the District of Columbia, have already legalized marijuana, but the CARERS Act would prevent the federal government from prosecuting businesses and individuals in states where medical marijuana is legal, since federally marijuana is still illegal under the Controlled Substances Act.

Yesterday the senate passed a bill increasing sanctions on Russia for interfering with our election and blocked trump from lifting sanctions.

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Today they show Sessions what they think of his nonsense.

The Senate has been a green light for Medical Marijuana. It seems as though it is just Jeff Sessions that has the problem with the whole thing. He stated that marijuana is more addicting and harmful than heroin.

Where does he get his facts and information from??

Sessions asked Congress in May to allow the Justice Department to prosecute businesses and individuals in states with medical marijuana laws

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Science Kicks Jeff Sessions In The Ass!

Since a few days ago Jeff Sessions, the Attorney General of the United States, had made an announcement that he wanted to crack down on Medical Marijuana. He had stated that there was no proof that Medical Marijuana could help and that it is highly addictive and will cause more damage in the long run.

Amid a drug crisis that kills 91 people in the US each day, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has asked Congress to help roll back protections that have shielded medical marijuana dispensaries from federal prosecutors since 2014, according to a letter made public this week. Those legal controls which bar Sessions’s Justice Department from funding crackdowns on the medical cannabis programs legalized by 29 states and Washington, D.C. jeopardize the DoJ’s ability to combat the country’s “historic drug epidemic” and control dangerous drug traffickers, the attorney general wrote in the letter sent to lawmakers.

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The catch, however, is that this epidemic is one of addiction and overdose deaths fueled by opioids—heroin, fentanyl and prescription painkillers—not marijuana. In fact, places where the U.S. has legalized medical marijuana have lower rates of opioid overdose deaths.

A review of the scientific literature indicates marijuana is far less addictive than prescription painkillers. A 2016 survey from University of Michigan researchers, published in the The Journal of Pain, found that chronic pain suffers who used cannabis reported a 64 percent drop in opioid use as well as fewer negative side effects and a better quality of life than they experienced under opioids. In a 2014 study reported in JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association, the authors found that annual opioid overdose deaths were about 25 percent lower on average in states that allowed medical cannabis compared with those that did not.

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And a significant number of pain sufferers would apparently prefer to use medical marijuana instead of prescription painkillers. A study  published in July 2016 in Health Affairs explored what happened to Medicare painkiller prescriptions after states green-lighted medical marijuana laws, and found that a typical physician in a state with medical cannabis prescribed 1,826 fewer painkiller doses for Medicare patients in a given year—because seniors instead turned to medical pot. There were also hundreds fewer doses prescribed for antidepressants, anti-nausea medications and antianxiety drugs.